19 4 / 2014

mughalshit:


Taj Mahal
India (Agra), approx. 1860 - 1880
Albumen silver print

 The Taj Mahal, built between 1632 and 1643 under the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (reigned 1627– 1658) for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal, is one of the most photographed buildings in the world. Most visitors to India today try to include it in their itineraries. This was also true in the 1800s, but in that period few people had their own cameras, so nearly all tourists had to buy professional pictures from important photographic studios in India and elsewhere.  Photographer Francis Frith (British, 1822– 1898) never went to India himself, but he established an important firm that offered views from all over the world— including many photographs of Indian buildings and scenery— acquired from a large number of his contemporaries.This image shows an interesting view of the Taj Mahal. The earliest sketches and photographs were usually taken from the riverside because, as suggested by this photograph, the trees of the gardens were so tall they hid some of the structure. In order to allow for a view of the whole tomb with its four minarets, photographs were taken from high atop the gateway at the entrance to the gardens. It is far less common to find pictures from inside the garden; only an impression of the whole can be gotten from such an intimate view.

mughalshit:

Taj Mahal

India (Agra), approx. 1860 - 1880

Albumen silver print

The Taj Mahal, built between 1632 and 1643 under the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (reigned 1627– 1658) for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal, is one of the most photographed buildings in the world. Most visitors to India today try to include it in their itineraries. This was also true in the 1800s, but in that period few people had their own cameras, so nearly all tourists had to buy professional pictures from important photographic studios in India and elsewhere.  Photographer Francis Frith (British, 1822– 1898) never went to India himself, but he established an important firm that offered views from all over the world— including many photographs of Indian buildings and scenery— acquired from a large number of his contemporaries.

This image shows an interesting view of the Taj Mahal. The earliest sketches and photographs were usually taken from the riverside because, as suggested by this photograph, the trees of the gardens were so tall they hid some of the structure. In order to allow for a view of the whole tomb with its four minarets, photographs were taken from high atop the gateway at the entrance to the gardens. It is far less common to find pictures from inside the garden; only an impression of the whole can be gotten from such an intimate view.

(Source: searchcollection.asianart.org, via bhagyawati)

19 4 / 2014

90s90s90s:

Power Rangers cast selfie

90s90s90s:

Power Rangers cast selfie

(via turkishpopstar)

19 4 / 2014

19 4 / 2014

pemwin:

ladybowtheboo:

asobita-i:

Reblog for the last one

it’s a game show where everyone eats the furniture in a room and tries to see which is made of chocolate

So basically you’re telling me this is the best fucking game ever created

(Source: iraffiruse, via dani-mynameforevermore)

19 4 / 2014

theatlantic:

General Mills: If You Clip This Coupon, You Can’t Sue Us

General Mills, the food mega-corporation that owns Betty Crocker, Nature Valley, and basically every sweet cereal you ate and served your kids, has a startling new legal policy making it illegal to sue the company after you:

- download or print a coupon;

- “join” an online communities (which online communities is in question, but possibly including Facebook);

- subscribe to an email newsletter;

- or redeem a promotion or participate in any “offering.”

In other words: It just became nearly impossible to get a deal on a General Mills product without forfeiting your rights to sue the company. Even if your kid with a peanut allergy eats a Fiber One bar with trace amounts of peanuts and gets sick. For this reason, the Times reports that the new terms could come under strict legal scrutiny.
This policy, known as “forced arbitration,” is becoming common among companies seeking ways to prevent users and customers from joining together and suing for millions of dollars for things like false advertising.
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

General Mills: If You Clip This Coupon, You Can’t Sue Us

General Mills, the food mega-corporation that owns Betty Crocker, Nature Valley, and basically every sweet cereal you ate and served your kids, has a startling new legal policy making it illegal to sue the company after you:

- download or print a coupon;

- “join” an online communities (which online communities is in question, but possibly including Facebook);

- subscribe to an email newsletter;

- or redeem a promotion or participate in any “offering.”

In other words: It just became nearly impossible to get a deal on a General Mills product without forfeiting your rights to sue the company. Even if your kid with a peanut allergy eats a Fiber One bar with trace amounts of peanuts and gets sick. For this reason, the Times reports that the new terms could come under strict legal scrutiny.

This policy, known as “forced arbitration,” is becoming common among companies seeking ways to prevent users and customers from joining together and suing for millions of dollars for things like false advertising.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

19 4 / 2014

19 4 / 2014

eltigrechico:

redsuspenders:

The Last Samurai starring Tom Cruise

The Last of the Mohicans starring Daniel Day-Lewis

The Mexican starring Brad Pitt

Prince of Persia starring Jake Gyllenhaal

image

(via keybladeofsteel)

19 4 / 2014

rhythmofbangles:

Indian Bride Watercolors by Unknown

(via bhagyawati)

19 4 / 2014

19 4 / 2014